Randy Alcorn's Blog: stewardship

Should I Leave An Inheritance To My Children?

By Randy Alcorn | August 3, 2015
For those desiring to be wise stewards of the money and possessions God has entrusted to them, a serious question might be, “What about our children? Aren’t we supposed to leave them all our money?”

For the follower of Jesus, is generosity optional or mandatory?

By Randy Alcorn | May 29, 2015
Generosity is optional in the sense that God gives us the freedom to choose, to do as we wish. It’s mandatory in that Jesus commands it and expects it of us. But I think it’s best to have a paradigm shift, to think of it as pure privilege with incredible rewards, both now and later. 

Should we have and use credit cards?

By Randy Alcorn | February 18, 2015
The ancient book of Proverbs applies directly to our use of credit cards: “A prudent person foresees danger and takes precautions. The simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences” (Proverbs 22:3).

Should We Leave Our Children Inheritances?

By Randy Alcorn | January 12, 2015
Scripture says that “A good man leaves an inheritance for his children’s children” (Proverbs 13:22). As a result, many Christians defend and justify leaving vast sums of wealth to their children and grandchildren. I think in order to understand the principle behind this verse, we need to compare what an inheritance meant in biblical times, versus what an inheritance means in this culture today. 

John Wesley’s Example of Giving

By Randy Alcorn | May 14, 2014
To turn the tide of materialism in the Christian community, we desperately need bold models of kingdom-centered living. 

What about Life Insurance?

By Randy Alcorn | March 31, 2014
Having enough insurance to be responsible is one thing. But playing God by factoring in every conceivable future scenario, and thereby overinsuring, is another.

The Full Implications of God’s Ownership

By Randy Alcorn | February 24, 2014
When I’ve taught from 1 Corinthians 6 in a college class, I have asked someone in the front row to lend me his pencil for a moment.